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The Norwegian Local Code
  1. Stay close to home - find hidden treasures in your local playground.
  2. Inform others about where you are going, but not necessarily everyone on social media.
  3. Don't spend too much time checking the weather report. You're close to home and getting wet can be fun.
  4. Respect the badgers, don't be one; Leave your speakers and loud music at home.
  5. Use a map and compass. Or not. Explore, get lost and use your senses. The trail is close by.
  6. Take care of nature! You want the playground to be around for a long time, right?
  7. Bring your garbage and shit back home with you. Literally. If others forget, bring theirs too.
  8. Bring the necessary equipment for fun and play. Borrow from others, buy if you must - in that case from someone who cares about your playground.
  9. Don't be ashamed to turn around, but don't be ashamed to turn up at a nice viewpoint you've never been to before either.

* Start the trip at your doorstep on your bike or feet. Don't take the bus if you don't have to.
* Making out and sharing tents should done with those you usually do these things with.

* Corona related (repealed later)


You might be wondering what the h*ll all this is. In Norway we have what we call "fjellvettreglene". Created by The Norwegian Trekking Association, they can be translated into The Norwegian Mountain Code, which is basically a set of guidelines directed toward your safety in the mountains.

But now that everything is closed, we can't spend our time in faraway mountains. That makes it the perfect time to experience the woods, lakes and hills around you. Many people here in Norway have understood this, and the places where we usually are all alone are now crawling with people. We love it! At the same time, there are a lot of people who haven't quite understood the concept of being outdoors. It's tempting to scream "Get your sh*t together!" at the morons who litter and bring their loudest speakers to the forrest. But we found a better solution: Let's instead inspire others to use nature in the ways we love to use nature. So we filled our glasses with red wine, logged onto Zoom and put together The Norwegian Local Code (lokalvettreglene).

But nothing will come of us leaning back with a glass of wine thinking we're smart. To change people's behavior we have to get a lot of people's attention. We need help! The next few days we will be hanging these signs in popular places in Oslo's nature areas. But we have to show more people than just those living in Norway's capital. How can you take part?

  1. Share this link!
  2. Share the photos of the signs from our social media. Use #lokalvettreglene (and even #northernplayground and #saveourplayground).
  3. If you want an extra challenge you can take a photo that represents one or more of the guidelines. Have you picked up someone else's trash? Got caught in the rain? Gotten lost? Let us know! Use #lokalvettreglene to be sure we see it.

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